Deadly Sacrifice brings us the first Black female police detective in UK fiction

A unique thriller that dives deep into the world of human trafficking and African ritual sacrifices, Deadly Sacrifice is based on the true 2001 news story in which a Black boy's torso was found in the Thames. Published as part of Jacaranda’s pioneering Twenty in 2020 series, Stella Oni’s debut novel joins a number of other groundbreaking titles in making real space for Black British stories.

Dead Dead Girls: A dark serial killer thriller set in 1920s Harlem

Dead Dead Girls is a gripping mystery set in 1920s Harlem that looks into the murder of young Black women. And the investigator to these murders? A young heroine known as the “Harlem Hero” who just wants to dance her nights away and sip on gin. Despite the glitz, glamour and Gatsby-like parties that we know the 1920s for, Dead Dead Girls presents a darker side of the Roaring Twenties era.

Abi Daré’s debut charts a new path for Nigerian literature

Abi Daré’s was one of the many middle-class Lagosian families who hired house girls for various domestic chores, and she noticed growing up how poorly treated these girls were. The Girl with the Louding Voice gives voice to the silenced and is a timeless story about a strong girl chasing her dreams. While Abi Daré takes on a voice that is not hers, she does so in order to unveil one that has hereto been shunned in the canon of African literature.

Maame Blue’s debut romance is a breathtaking love letter to diaspora

Maame Blue's astonishing debut is a tender portrait of diasporic community showcasing the resilience of love across time and space. Bad Love has a somewhat misleading title. Though it is about how we hurt and are hurt in love, it is ultimately about the resilience of love across space and time. One of Jacaranda’s Twenty in 2020, Blue's exceptional gift for characterisation leads her to achieve something that very few do: a protagonist-led novel that makes you forget that it is.

Hari Ziyad’s debut memoir is a perfect blend of the personal and the political

Black Boy Out of Time is an eloquent and enlightening testament to the ways in which Black authors re-craft genre categories that are not truly interested in telling our stories. When Ziyad sat down to write it, that truth became quickly apparent. This memoir is essential because it dares to dream of a future that is not beholden to any of the systems and structures that many of us are afraid to transcend, even imaginatively.