Travelling While Black: Opening readers’ eyes to a unique conversation on what it means to travel in this disoriented world

Nanjala Nyabola offers an insightful look from an experienced explorer’s perspective into how travel intersects with topics like migration, identity and the freedom to move. It’s an insightful read for the average traveller who wants a broader perspective on what it’s like to travel in a world that privileges some but restricts many others from moving around. Nyabola goes everywhere, from giving a voice to victims of domestic and sexual abuse in Haiti to exploring academia’s fascination with romanticising trauma rather than studying the complex cultural system that makes up her own hometown of Nairobi, Kenya.

Hari Ziyad’s debut memoir is a perfect blend of the personal and the political

Black Boy Out of Time is an eloquent and enlightening testament to the ways in which Black authors re-craft genre categories that are not truly interested in telling our stories. When Ziyad sat down to write it, that truth became quickly apparent. This memoir is essential because it dares to dream of a future that is not beholden to any of the systems and structures that many of us are afraid to transcend, even imaginatively.

“Black queerness gives us space to imagine”: A conversation with Hari Ziyad

One of nineteen children raised by a Hindu Hare Kṛṣṇa mother and a Muslim father, Hari’s is a coming-of-story about growing up a Black queer boy in a carceral world that criminalises Black children for existing. In this interview, the bestselling author of the debut memoir titled Black Boy Out of Time talks at length about the limitations of writing, community care, the role of theory, and the global publishing industrial complex.

A Black British exposé of Britain’s most prestigious school and the rotten system it heads

As it looks behind the beautifully imposing stone façades of the institution and dares to probe the heart of Britishness, One of Them is at once critical and lyrical. From the Etonian style of behind-your-back racism and the bloody secrets of its prestigious halls, to the unapologetic bigotry of the National Front and dangerous rhetoric of high-profile politicians, Okwonga’s unveils the multiple faces of British racism and traces how they are intricately linked in a system rigged for Eton’s white, upper-class graduates.

The winner of the 2020 Jhalak Prize is a pioneering travelogue about continental Black Europe

With Afropean, Pitts leads the way in spotlighting the flavour and entangled histories of Europe's Black communities through what may be one of the most comprehensive and transnational studies on the subject to date. Any discussion of Afropean should begin with an acknowledgement of how it is a pioneering work, and certainly so within the Anglophone literary tradition. Pitts says it best: “the US exports its blackness; Europe does not.”