Real and riveting, In Every Mirror She’s Black is the perfect read

Imagine the thrilling pacing of gripping genre fiction, the socio-political urgency of literary fiction, and the sharp clarity of non-fiction all thrown together to tell a story that has never been told before: the story of Black women in Sweden. Across class, career, and culture, Kemi, Brittany-Rae, and Muna experience Stockholm in vastly different ways relative to their Blackness but all three are, fundamentally, devastatingly lonely. Solitude is the real story of In Every Mirror She’s Black, a unique distillation of commercial and literary fiction that ultimately hits like a tragedy.

Shadow Forward: A Review of My Monticello

A debut collection of fiction, these five short stories and novella shape the dust of the past. My Monticello pulsates the contemporary moment’s terror and uncertainty, during which the vestiges of United States chattel slavery grasp the grooves of our fingerprints. As you make your way through this debut collection, think about the living and the dead. Who and what are we the product of, and what is the future of this current birthing? I want us to exercise patience as we wait for the arrival of answers. Are we okay with not knowing?

After a 20-year publishing hiatus, Gayl Jones is back with a heady historical fiction

After publishing to great acclaim in the 1980s and 1990s, Gayl Jones disappeared from the public eye. Somewhere in the last few pages of this brutal historical fiction that has been half a century in the making, our protagonist—the observational Almeyda—asks “how can one write such a history and live through it at the same time?”. A fragmented narrative of slavery and survival set in 17th century colonial Brazil, Palmares begs the same question.

“I grew up obsessed with this alternate version of myself”: A conversation with Safia Elhillo

Safia Elhillo is an award-winning Sudanese-American contemporary poet and Stanford University Fellow. Author of The January Children (2017), Home is Not a Country (2021), Girls That Never Die (forthcoming), and co-editor of anthology Halal If You Hear Me (2019), her work has been recognised internationally for its originality of form and capacity for tenderness. In this interview, Safia speaks to us about the inspiration behind Home is Not a Country, her roots, and writing a world that reflects the one she grew up in.

“I’m writing the stories I need to write”: A conversation with Dean Atta

Dean Atta is a Greek-Cypriot Jamaican-British poet who was named one of the most influential LGBT people in Britain by the Independent on Sunday. Weaned on spoken word and online poetry culture, Dean rose to internet fame when he wrote a poem titled "I am Nobody's Nigger" following the death of Stephen Lawrence. On an early morning in late June, he is bright and bubbly, talking effusively about his writing and bouncing between topics with that palpable joy that is so characteristic of his work, particularly his debut novel, The Black Flamingo (2019).