We are now accepting submissions until 30 November for the inaugural issue of our print and digital bi-annual magazine.

Please email submissions to bigblackbooks@hotmail.com. Your subject line should look something like this: [FICTION/NON-FICTION/POETRY/ETC.] SUBMISSION – [YOUR NAME] – [TITLE OF PIECE(S)]. Include a 50-word bio in the body of your email and your work as an attachment. Any file format is fine.

PROMPT

Our inaugural issue will be titled New Black Writing. As you’ve probably already deduced, this issue is committed to championing new Black voices from Africa and her diasporas across America, Britain, the Caribbean, Canada, Europe, and wherever else Black people have blessed. People of mixed or biracial Black heritage are welcome.

There is power in numbers; in pan-Africanism; in Black internationalism; in putting Black voices from everywhere and anywhere into fruitful dialogue and communion. It’s both a terrifying and exciting time—economically, politically, socially, and of course culturally. We want to capture the trepidation, exhilaration, frustration, and perhaps infinite possibility of the now. We want to hear how you see the past and the future converging in the present, in the new. New Black Writing is a still of the Black moment.

From genre and literary fiction to op-eds and criticism to prose poetry and graphic lit to memoir and manifestos to hybrid pieces and literature-we-have-yet-to-categorise, New Black Writing welcomes the very experimental and very best new writing across a variety of forms, themes, genres, issues, and more. Attract us with your daringness and keep us with your craft.

TIMELINE

Submissions for Issue 1 will be open from 1 October to 30 November 2021. All submitters will hear back by 20 December 2021. We can provide individual feedback upon request.

Those selected should be available throughout January and February 2022 for the editing process. New Black Writing will be published in April 2022.

GUIDELINES

We have no set maximum or minimum length. Most individual prose piece should be between 1000-5000 words and no poem should be longer than 7 pages. You are free to submit more than one piece and/or more than once. All submissions should be in ‘English’. We’re eager to read work in ‘pidgin’, idiolect, dialect, slang, and work in languages that are not recognised in mainstream publishing. Translations are welcome and should be accompanied by a copy of the original text. We prefer pitches for research-heavy non-fiction like interviews, op-eds, and criticism.

FORM & FORMAT

We’re form-irreverent and accept pretty much everything: reviews, criticism, interviews, oral literature, short stories, flash, CNF, personal essays, memoir, poetry, prose poetry, op-eds, graphic literature, manifestos, letters, podcasts, video essays, hybrid pieces, and more. What’s important is that your work is provocative and accessible—send us your very best. If you are unsure about whether it qualifies, ask us at bigblackbooks@hotmail.com.

The issue will be available in both print and digital form, with each being slightly different and including content that is exclusive to that form. For example, the digital issue may include recorded oral literature, podcasts, and video essays.

COPYRIGHT & COMPENSATION

New writing also means writing that hasn’t been published anywhere before. Personal blogs and websites are an exception. We only ask for first-time publication rights and are happy for work to be reprinted elsewhere after the issue is published if we are acknowledged.

We are a very new publication and cannot guarantee pay right now. We are hoping to change this soon and put the ‘paying’ into our mission of paying Black readers, writers, authors, and publishers their literary dues.

All contributors will receive a free copy of the issue. Any profits will be split evenly among contributors.

 

 

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