The Go-Between: An upper class immigration story about race and place

After a certain number of years spent authoring, writing about experiences that are not your own simply comes with the territory. In The Go-Between, Veronica Chambers offers a peek into the story of rich Mexican immigrants and how they find out that, moneyed or not, they cannot shed the stain of their origins. The perennially devalued Afro-Latina is particularly well-placed to tell that type of story.

Travelling While Black: Opening readers’ eyes to a unique conversation on what it means to travel in this disoriented world

Nanjala Nyabola offers an insightful look from an experienced explorer’s perspective into how travel intersects with topics like migration, identity and the freedom to move. It’s an insightful read for the average traveller who wants a broader perspective on what it’s like to travel in a world that privileges some but restricts many others from moving around.

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Bestselling romance author Donna Hill tries her hand at historical fiction

When the fiery, Malcolm X-loving urban poet Anita gets on a bus and meets a reserved, MLK-supporting Southerner who is moving to Harlem for the cause, it is love at first sight. What makes this historical romance necessary is its willingness to recruit love’s lessons on empathetic understanding to, as bell hooks might have it, disarm the legitimacy of any politics that attempts to exist without it.

"A Pride and Prejudice Remix" that packs a punch

It is always wonderful to see Black love poured into a timeless story of star-crossed love thriving against all odds. In spite of the weighty social issues that come with the territory, Pride is a deeply representative retelling that foregrounds Black people’s right to exist in a canon that has always pretended they do not. From the original’s classism to its silences on slavery, this novel gently gestures to Jane Austen’s prejudices in a fun, fresh way.

OPEN WATER: An ethereal meditation on Black love and art

In this slow and steady tale of Black love, we experience the world through the eyes of a young Londoner whose relationship buckles under the excruciating pressure occasioned by being a Black man in a white supremacist world that wants you dead. But don’t let generic phrases like black love fool you: this is also a novel about photography, mental health, pain, joy, music, vulnerability, and ultimately salvation.